Why Autumn Is the Best Time to Visit Lapland

Walk with me among Lapland’s forests in autumn, along paths covered in yellow and crimson leaves. Through woodlands where you can pick and eat ripe berries right off the bush. I’ve found no greater peace than being alone in the Finnish wilderness – aside from the occasional reindeer – surrounded by changing trees as they reflect off the lakes.

Walk with me among Lapland’s forests in autumn, along paths covered in yellow and crimson leaves. Through woodlands where you can pick and eat ripe berries right off the bush. 

I’ve found no greater peace than being alone in the Finnish wilderness – aside from the occasional reindeer – surrounded by changing trees as they reflect off the lakes.

A board path deep in the forest of Lapland, Finland surrounded by autumn colors of yellow, red, and green.
Cali Girl Travels World Boots on a white pathway above hundreds of yellow and red autumn leaves in Inari, Finland.
A colorful nature path through the forests of Inari, Finland, with overgrown yellow and red leaves everywhere.
A nature path surrounded by red, yellow, and green fall leaves and trees.
Fire pit along a nature walk in Inari, Finland.

White row boat on the shore of a clear water lake in Lapland, Finland.
The first time I saw the northern lights in Lapland, Finland
A Finnish hotel we saw on our drive from Rovaniemi to Inari.
Cali Girl Travels World walking along a pathway in Inari, Finland through a forest of yellow leafed trees.
 Three grey mushrooms growing on top of a rock in Finland in Autumn.
One orange mushroom growing in between two rocks.
Ligonberries and Bilberries still on the bush covered in rain drops in Lapland, Finland.
Group of white mushrooms growing along a nature walk in Scandinavia.
Bilberry growing on autumn leaves in Lapland.
A brown mushroom and reindeer lichen in macro mode I found along a nature walk in Inari
 Ligonberries naturally carpeting the floor of the forest in Finland.

A path through the forest in autumn in Inari, Finland.
A winter white reindeer we found deep in the forest in Finland.
GoPro photo of the northern lights taken in the arctic circle, the aurora borealis is green and yellow.
Two traditional ochre red buildings and homes that can be found throughout Finland.
Pinecones among the lichen of the Finnish forest.
Feeding reindeer lichen in Santa Claus Village.
Little baby reindeer wanting to be fed fresh lichen that's in my pocket at Santa Claus Village in the arctic circle, Finland.
Double rainbow over Lake Inari in Lapland, Finland.
Wilderness hut shelter with a fire pit along a nature walk in Inari, Lapland.
Travel blogger walking down a nature path in Inari, Finand surrounded by autumn colours.
Stream coming off from a lake in Inari, Finland surrounded by ruska colors of yellow and red.
A pathway through the Finnish wilderness above puddles surrounded by ruska colors.
 A continuation of a pathway leading into a forest in Lapland surrounded by autumn colors.

A walking path among strikingly bright autumn trees and leaves of red, orange, yellow, in Inari, Lapland in Finland.
A reindeer deep in the forest of Lapland among the autumn colors.
A pathway along the cliffs of the Finnish forest near Auttikongas waterfall
A old logging chute down the waterfall of Auttikongas near Rovaniemi, Lapland, Finland.
A man pulling his way back to safety after falling off a tight rope across the Auttikongas gorge.
Travel blogger visiting Auttikongas river gorge near Rovaniemi, Finland in Lapland among ruska or autumn colors.
GoPro photo of the northern lights taken in the arctic circle, the aurora borealis is green.

Did Lapland blow you away? Yeah, me too.

I understand that most tourists are drawn to Lapland as a winter wonderland. But maybe it’s better in theory than reality.

The idea of cuddling up in a glass igloo looking up at the northern lights sounds amazing. However, in winter the chances of having an unobstructed view of the auroras from a glass ceiling hotel room is rare. Because, unless you’re in the northernmost region of Finland, the northern lights usually appear north of you, not directly above you, often leaving trees or buildings around you blocking your view.

Be honest, in sub-zero temperatures are you really willing to leave your heated room to put on many layers of clothing to trek through snow to hunt the northern lights?

If so, how long would you be able to endure -25ºC (-13ºF) temperatures outside in winter’s almost 24 hours a day of darkness?

If this still sounds like an ideal adventure to you, I’ll add that September and March are the months you’re most likely to witness the aurora borealis. These two months are dark enough, but still have clear skies, opposed to the cloudy winter months from mid-October to February.

On top of all that, your activities will be restricted by the lack of sunlight, stormy weather, and all the other winter tourists inflating the prices of tours and accommodation.

For the best experience come in autumn when you can explore all of what Lapland has to offer you.

Did I convince you to travel to Lapland in Autumn?

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Hi, I’m Brit!

I'm from California, but I don't live anywhere. I've lived out of a suitcase for 5 years among exactly 50 countries, and I don't ever plan to stop. Come travel with me around the world.

Hi, I’m Brit!

I'm from California, but I don't live anywhere. I've lived out of a suitcase for 5 years among exactly 50 countries, and I don't ever plan to stop. Come travel with me around the world.

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